Rebuilding for a better urban future

The official blog of UN-Habitat's response to Typhoon Haiyan

On-site Assessments in Capiz for Potential Shelter Project Beneficiaries

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Rogie Alcazaren and family and the remnants of their home—in which they still reside.

Rogie Alcazaren and family and the remnants of their home—in which they still reside.

On 20 and 23 June, technical assessments were conducted in Belle Village HOAI (Home Owners’ Association Inc.) community in the municipality of Pontevedra, Capiz.  Ninety-five households submitted applications for  reconstruction assistance.  UN-Habitat technical team visited each household to assess the extent of the damage, to check lot boundaries, and to interview the applicants about their current living conditions. While some applicants temporarily live with relatives outside the community, many continue to live in their damaged homes after having done some repairs themselves with salvaged materials. Many of these  repaired houses had not been built back safer and were found to be unsafe and unlikely to withstand future typhoons. In the case of Rogie Alcazaren in Belle Village III, his house was heavily damaged. Despite that, his family (with seven children) had no other option but to continue residing under their now slanted roof and whatever else was left of their house.

Unable to remove the coconut tree trunk that struck their house during Typhoon Haiyan, a doughnut seller and his son continue to live in perilous conditions and are potential project beneficiaries.

Unable to remove the coconut tree trunk that struck their house during Typhoon Haiyan, a doughnut seller and his son continue to live in perilous conditions and are potential project beneficiaries.

Ms. Alcazaren in a makeshift kitchen with a half-exposed wall on one side and a slanted roof overhead.

Ms. Alcazaren in a makeshift kitchen with a half-exposed wall on one side and a slanted roof overhead.

In Belle Village II, due to its low-lying location and lack of proper community infrastructure, footpaths to the houses are swampy, substantially compromising mobility for people. Improvement of community infrastructure such as drainages and paving the common foot path were identified as urgent issues.

Swampy footpaths  in Belle Village II, Pontevedra, compromise the mobility of people and the expedient delivery of goods and services. Photo by Edver Francisco.

Swampy footpaths in Belle Village II, Pontevedra, compromise the mobility of people and the expedient delivery of goods and services. Photo by Edver Francisco.

So far, out of 2,430 families in 20 HOAI communities from 10 Barangays in Capiz and Iloilo Provinces, 331 families have submitted their applications to UN-Habitat and initial technical assessment and verification of potential beneficiaries were completed at 240 sites. Work is ongoing, and follow-up visits are required to help the HOAIs prepare their final list of qualified beneficiaries.

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Author: UN-Habitat Philippines

This is the official blog of the UN-Habitat's response to Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines

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